Denmark to allow ‘significantly reduced’ mink production

Denmark’s government says a temporary ban on mink breeding will expire Jan. 1, allowing mink production to resume in the country but at a ”significantly reduced” level than before the coronavirus pandemic

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Denmark’s government said a temporary ban on mink breeding will expire Jan. 1, allowing mink production to resume in the country but at a ”significantly reduced” level than before the coronavirus pandemic.

The Danish government nearly two years ago ordered a cull of millions of minks to minimize the risk of the small mammals retransmitting the virus. The Scandinavian country banned mink farming in November 2020 to contain a mutated version of the coronavirus that could spread to people.

The Environment and Food Ministry said health officials now think “there is a limited risk to public health by resuming significantly reduced mink production and by introducing infection prevention measures.”

The government said the decision to lift the temporary ban was based on an assessment by the Statens Serum Institut, a government agency that maps the spread of diseases in Denmark.

Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Minister Rasmus Prehn and institute officials plan to meet later Friday with representatives of the Danish mink industry to “review the infection prevention measures for the industry.”

The government said veterinary and health authorities have drawn up a model with requirements for handling COVID-19 in mink herds that breeders must “implement and comply with in order to be able to keep mink again after the turn of the year.”

Denmark was one of the world’s main mink fur exporters, producing an estimated 17 million furs per year. Kopenhagen Fur, a cooperative of 1,500 Danish breeders, accounts for 40% of global mink production. Most of its exports went to China and Hong Kong.

Source ABC

A tech blog author and superhero who writes about technology and its impact on society, business, and everyday life

Related Posts

Rebel violence in eastern Congo causes hunger to soar

NYIRAGONGO, Congo — The last thing Pasika Bagerimana remembers before her sons died were their cries of hunger. But the 25-year-old mother had nothing to feed them. “’Mom, I need…

Read more

Testing trouble adds to disorder in Uganda’s Ebola response

MUBENDE, Uganda — The nurse wanted the toddler with a high fever transferred at once from a private clinic in Uganda to a public hospital even though the child tested…

Read more

NIH to fund unproven ALS drugs under patient-backed law

WASHINGTON — When patients with a deadly diagnosis and few treatment options have tried to get unapproved, experimental drugs, they have long faced a dilemma: Who will pay? Responsibility for…

Read more

Michigan women fight to preserve abortion, 1 chat at a time

UTICA, Mich. — At a wine bar in suburban Detroit, about a dozen women strategized about how to preserve the right to abortion in their state. This was not a…

Read more

Arizona judge won’t suspend ruling that halted all abortions

PHOENIX — An Arizona judge on Friday declined to put her order that allowed enforcement of a pre-statehood law making it a crime to provide an abortion on hold, saying…

Read more

Some officials now say monkeypox elimination unlikely in US

NEW YORK — Some U.S. health officials are conceding that monkeypox is probably not going away anytime soon. The disease’s spread is slowing but the virus is so widespread that…

Read more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.